Nov 19, 2018  
2017-2019 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2017-2019 Undergraduate Catalog

Economics Minor


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The minor in economics has advantages for both business majors and non-business majors. Minoring in economics may be a smart move academically and for your career.

Business Majors -19 crs.


The advantage for business majors is the minor in economics provides a liberal arts component to complement the business degree. Many employers are seeking students who can think about business problems in a broader context. They are also seeking students with problem solving and analytical abilities. A minor in economics demonstrates breadth, analytical ability, willingness to take challenging courses, and an understanding of the method of a social science. Business majors already take seven credit hours of economics. The economic minor requires only four additional elective courses (two of which must be at the 300/400 level), which can be selected to complement your major.

Electives (12 crs.)


Course selected by advisement.

A minimum of 6 credits must be earned at the 300/400 level

Non-business Majors - 18 crs.


A minor in economics is an excellent complement to many majors. Economics is a relevant major for students preparing for a career in business, law, and many other fields who prefer a liberal arts education. The minor in economics provides some of the same background, but with less depth. With proper advisement, a minor in economics can provide the economics prerequisites for an MBA program or for graduate work in economics. The minor in economics requires students to take ECO 101 , ECO 102  and four additional electives courses (two of which must be at the 300/400 level). One of these can be used for general education category D. May students already have a sequence in economics required by their major and can complete a minor by taking only a few additional courses. The minor in economics can be combined with a sequence of courses in business for students who are seeking employment in the business world, but do not want a business major. For example, ACC 200 , ACC 201 , BSL 261 , MIS 142 , and SCM 200  are some appropriate courses available to non-business majors at the lower division level for students who have taken the prerequisites. Some upper division business courses may also be available to non-business majors.

Core Courses (6 crs.)


Students may substitute ECO 113  for ECO 101  and ECO 102 , but then will need to take an additional elective.

Electives (12 crs.)


Course selected by advisement.

A minimum of 6 credits must be earned at the 300/400 level.

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